Good Samaritan Law

Did you know the state of Illinois has a “Good Samaritan Law”?

The law states:

Amends the Illinois Controlled Substances Act and the Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Act. Provides that a person who, in good faith, seeks or obtains emergency medical assistance for someone experiencing an overdose shall not be charged or prosecuted for Class 4 felony possession of a controlled, counterfeit, or look-alike substance, a controlled substance analog, or Class 3 felony methamphetamine if evidence for the possession charge was acquired as a result of the person seeking or obtaining emergency medical assistance. Provides that a person who is experiencing an overdose shall not be charged or prosecuted for Class 4 felony possession of a controlled, counterfeit, or look-alike substance, or a controlled substance analog, or in the case of methamphetamine Class 3 felony possession if evidence for the possession charge was acquired as a result of the person seeking or obtaining emergency medical assistance. Provides that the action of seeking or obtaining emergency medical assistance for an overdose may be used as a mitigating factor in a criminal prosecution for Class 3 felony or higher possession, manufacture or delivery of a controlled, counterfeit, or look-alike substance or a controlled substance analog, or in the case of methamphetamine Class 2 felony or higher possession, manufacture or delivery of methamphetamine. Effective immediately.

So what does that mean?

When calling 911 or taking someone to an emergency room for an overdose, you and the person overdosing cannot be charged with possession for small amounts of illegal drugs (3g or less of heroin or cocaine, or 1 gram or less of methamphetamine).

View the Social Host Law